Regarding That Disregarded Entity…

The Treasury Department has clamped down on a key reporting exemption that was previously enjoyed by foreign-owned, single-member limited liability companies (SMLLCs).  This cDisregard second thoughthange has significant impacts on any foreign person or entity with holdings in U.S. SMLLCs that are disregarded for federal income tax purposes.  Previously, these entities were exempt from the comprehensive record maintenance and associated compliance requirements that applied to 25% foreign-owned domestic corporations.  Now, substantially any transaction between U.S. domestic disregarded entities and their foreign owners, including any of the owner’s related entities, may be reportable.

These regulations are part of a larger effort by the Treasury Department to increase financial transparency.  Entities subject to these regulations will continue to be treated as disregarded for other federal tax purposes.  The Treasury Department explained that there is a class of foreign-owned U.S. entity (typically SMLLCs) that has no obligation to report information to the IRS or even obtain a tax identification number.  According to the government, these “disregarded entities” could be used to shield the foreign owners of non-U.S. assets or bank accounts.  By treating domestic disregarded entities that are wholly owned by a foreign person as a domestic corporation separate from its owner (for these limited reporting and compliance requirements), the regulations enable the IRS to determine the existence and magnitude of any tax liability and share information with tax authorities in other countries.

Requirements
Previously, certain disregarded entities and their foreign owners may not have had an obligation to file a tax return or obtain an Employer Identification Number (EIN).  The final regulations require foreign owned domestic disregarded entities to:

  • Obtain EINs from the IRS
  • Annually file Form 5472, Information Return of a 25% Foreign-Owned U.S. Corporation or a Foreign Corporation Engaged in a U.S. Trade or Business
  • Identify “reportable transactions” between the LLC and any related parties, including the LLC’s foreign owner
  • Maintain supporting books and records

Regulations
These rules treat U.S. disregarded entities as stand-alone foreign-owned domestic corporations.  Therefore, they are now required to file Form 5472 with respect to reportable transactions between the entity and its foreign owner or other foreign related parties. Transactions are reportable as if the entity were a corporation for U.S. tax purposes. These entities also are required to maintain records sufficient to establish the accuracy of the information return and the proper U.S. tax treatment of such transactions.

Please see the regulations for examples of reportable transactions that require reporting, elimination of certain reporting exemptions, and overlap rules affecting controlled foreign corporations and foreign sales corporations.

Tax Year
The final regulations require the domestic reporting corporations to have the same tax year as their foreign owner if that foreign owner has an existing U.S. reporting obligation. If the foreign owner has no U.S. return filing obligation, then the domestic reporting corporation must report on a calendar year basis.

Effective Date
The final regulations are effective December 13, 2016, and apply to tax years beginning on or after January 1, 2017, and ending on or after December 13, 2017.


Jim Lennon Photographer 175-H2 Commerce Drive Hauppauge NY 631-617-5872

Lisa S. Goldman, CPA is Partner-in-Charge of Wealth Management at Raich Ende Malter & Co. LLP, with more than 20 years’ experience serving Fortune 500 corporations and privately-owned companies in the real estate, manufacturing, and consumer products industries. She specializes in international taxation and in providing services for high-net-worth individuals and their businesses. Ms. Goldman is a trust and estate practitioner (TEP) under the auspices of STEP and is a member of the NYSSCPA’s International Taxation Committee and the AICPA Tax Division. She frequently writes and lectures on international tax topics. Reach Lisa at 212-944-4433 or lgoldman@rem-co.com.

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The Bigger, Better R&D Credit

 

 

R and D signpost

Image courtesy of iStock

Businesses may receive a research and development (“R&D”) tax credit for qualifying research expenditures incurred when developing and designing new or improved products and processes.  While it is a common misconception that the R&D credit mostly applies to large businesses in the scientific and medical industries, the reality is that the credit has a much wider breadth of business niches. The credit can apply to a broad range of industries including (but not limited to) tech, manufacturing, design, and construction companies.

For tax years beginning January 1, 2016, Congress has made several changes to allow more businesses to reap the benefits of the R&D credit.

What are qualified research activities and expenditures, and who may be eligible?

Any activity that falls under the definition of “qualified research” may be eligible for the credit. Essentially, a business’s research activities must be related to a process or product’s new or improved function, performance, reliability, and/or quality. These can include activities conducted to improve or modify techniques or methods in a process. Qualified expenditures include wages, supplies, and contracted research expenses.

Of course, expenses related to “qualified research” encompasses an array of activities, whether it’s finding a new method/technique to print a graphic design on a T-shirt or changing the way a house is built to make it more energy efficient.

As you can see, the ambiguity surrounding what activities could qualify is relatively significant. One key indicator that a business may be eligible for the credit is if it employs product development personnel, engineers, or software developers. Tech startups, especially, must be informed about this credit as there has been an increasing boom in the industry.

How much is the credit?

The credit is based on a percentage of qualified research expenditures, including wages, supplies, and contracted research expenses.

Recent Developments

There are three major developments in the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (“PATH”) Act of 2015.

  • The PATH Act made the credit permanent, prospectively. Since 1981, the credit was only extended from year to year.
  • The R&D credit is now considered a general business credit. This allows eligible small businesses or owners of those businesses to apply the credit against their Alternative Minimum Tax (“AMT”). This provision is most helpful to businesses that have an overall net loss, but owe tax due to AMT. Historically, the company would still owe tax, because the R&D credit could not be used to offset AMT.
  • Lastly, qualified small businesses with gross receipts of less than $5,000,000 can now apply the credit against the employer’s portion of payroll taxes of up to $250,000 per year. The credit against payroll taxes is especially beneficial for new businesses, since startup companies are inherently prone to incurring losses during their first few years of operations. Previously, startups that sustained losses were unable to utilize the R&D credit because, generally, there wouldn’t be any tax to apply the credit towards. As businesses begin to turn a profit, they can finally utilize the credit and save in taxes.

The R&D tax credit rules are highly complex. If you think you may be eligible for the R&D credit, please consult a tax professional.


nyein_heatherHeather Nyein is a tax supervisor in REM’s Broadway office. Contact Heather at hnyein@rem-co.com or 212-944-4433.

Health Insurance: Are You Required To Provide?

Small business owners may be surprised to learn that, starting in 2016, guidelines are changing dramatically for which employers are regarded as Applicable Large Employers (ALE) in regard to the Affordable Care Act (ACA). As of this year, this employer mandate is more complex. Put simply, you may be legally obligated to provide certain employees with health insurance, even if you weren’t required last year. Failure to do so could result in significant penalties.

A company or organization becomes an ALE when it employs an average of 50 or more full-time (FT) or full-time equivalent (FTE) employees. To determine whether the employer mandate is met, the total number of FT plus FTE employees is averaged across the months in the current year, and the result (over or under 50) is applied to the next calendar year.

Who is counted as an employee for ALE criteria? When determining whether an employer is an ALE, the employer must count all of its employees. An FT employee either has an average of 30 hours of service per week during the calendar month or has at least 130 hours of service in a calendar month. To calculate FTEs, the working hours of part-time employees are combined and counted as equivalent full-time employees.

A noteworthy exception is for employers of seasonal workers. If the employer’s workforce (both FT and FTE) exceeds 50 for 120 days or fewer, and any employees in excess of 50 employed during those 120 days are seasonal workers (e.g., a lifeguard hired to work June through August, or a retail cashier hired for the holidays), then that employer is exempt from the mandate.

Some workers should not be included in the calculation of ALE employees. These include sole proprietors, partners in a partnership, 2% or more S-corporation shareholders, temporary employees (hired and paid for through an agency), and independent contractors.

The point? Companies and organizations near the 50-employee mark need to keep careful employment records, and their payroll teams and external payroll providers should use these to determine if they meet the ALE criteria. These crucial protocols should be put in place now and continued moving forward.


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